Dementia is one of the most significant health crises of the 21st century

Guest Blog from Alzheimer’s Disease International

Every 3 seconds, someone in the world develops dementia. Today, more than 46 million people are living with the disease. This number is set to almost double every 20 years, making the dementia one of the most significant health crises of the 21st century.

Dementia is a collective name for degenerative brain syndromes which affect memory, thinking, behaviour and emotion. Although each person will experience dementia in their own way, after a period of time people living with dementia are unable to care for themselves and need help with all aspects of daily life.

Many people around the world are now living for longer. Over the past century, successes in improving standards of health and social care means the world population now has more older people than ever before.

As a result, much of the increase in dementia’s global prevalence will take place in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Today, over half of all people with dementia live in LMICs. By 2050, this will rise to 68%, so it is vital we are able to help these countries provide services and support.

In 2015, the global cost of dementia care is estimated at $818 billion. If global dementia care were a company, it would be the world’s largest by annual revenue exceeding Apple (US$ 742 billion) and Google (US$ 368 billion). In just three years’ time, dementia is set to become a trillion dollar disease.

Across the globe, there is a growing awareness about dementia, but stigma and misinformation remain significant barriers to making the world a better place for people living with the disease.

2 out of 3 people globally believe there is little or no understanding of dementia in their countries, so it’s essential we work together to educate ourselves and our communities to dispel lingering myths about dementia.

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September is World Alzheimer’s Month™, an international campaign to raise awareness and challenge stigma. During September, Alzheimer associations around the world focus campaigns on advocacy and public awareness with a packed month of activities including information provision, Memory Walks and media appearances. Each year, more and more countries are participating in World Alzheimer’s Month events and in many areas, dementia awareness is growing.

ADI is the umbrella organisation of over 80 Alzheimer’s associations around the globe. It’s thanks to the hard work and dedication of these national Alzheimer associations that the impact of World Alzheimer’s Month is felt at both a national and global level.

World Alzheimer’s Month is a time for action, a global movement united by its call for change, but it is also a time to reflect on the impact of dementia, a disease that will affect more and more people as the years pass.

Dementia is a global issue that demands a global solution. By educating ourselves about dementia and campaigning for better health and social care provision we can help people living with dementia both now and in the future. By joining us this September and helping to spread the word you can help us make this a reality.

Find out how you can get involved and find events in your country by visiting www.worldalzmonth.org and following Alzheimer’s Disease International on Twitter and Facebook.

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About Julia Manning

Julia Manning is a social entrepreneur, writer, campaigner and commentator. She is based in London and is the founder and Chief Executive of 2020health, an independent, social enterprise Think Tank whose aim is to Make Health Personal. Through networking, technology, research, relationships and campaigning 2020health has influenced opinion and action in fields as diverse as bioethics, alcohol, emerging technologies, fraud, education, consumer technology and vaccination. Julia studied visual science at City University and became a member of the College of Optometrists in 1991. Her career has included being a visiting lecturer at City University, a visiting clinician at the Royal Free Hospital, working with south London Primary Care Trusts and as a Director of the UK Institute of Optometry. She specialised in diabetes (University of Warwick Certificate in Diabetic Care) and founded Julia Manning Eyecare in 2004, a home and prison visiting practice for people with mental and physical disabilities using the latest digital technology, which she sold to Healthcall (now part of Specsavers) in 2009. Experiences of working in the NHS, contributing to policy development, raising two children in the inner-city and standing in the General Election in Bristol in 2005 led to Julia forming 2020health at the end of 2006. Julia is a regular guest on TV and radio shows such as BBC News, ITV’s Daybreak/ GMB, Channel 5 News, BBC 1′s The Big Questions, BBC Radio, LBC and has taken part in debates and contributed to BBC’s Newsnight, Panorama, You and Yours and ITV’s The Week. She is mum to a rugby-mad son, a daughter passionate about Shakespeare, and wife of a comprehensive school assistant head-teacher. She loves gardening, ballet, Zimbabwe, her Westies Skye and Angus, is an honorary research associate at UCL and a Fellow of the RSA.
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